swimmiesofdoom:

israel bombed gaza’s zoo today.  no, hamas wasn’t there.
israel has bombed hospitals.  no, hamas wasn’t there.
israel has bombed schools.  no, hamas wasn’t there.
israel has bombed apartments, homes, and the streets.  israel has bombed the beaches.  israel has put out snipers to shoot at fleeing women and children and men.
israel is an apartheid state.
hamas doesn’t exist in a vaccuum. israel created hamas.  without israeli oppression and occupation and apartheid, there would be no hamas.
wonder woman wouldn’t stand for any of this shit.  you are not right, gal gadot, and israel.  you are not right, and you will not overcome.  you will never overcome.

swimmiesofdoom:

israel bombed gaza’s zoo today.  no, hamas wasn’t there.

israel has bombed hospitals.  no, hamas wasn’t there.

israel has bombed schools.  no, hamas wasn’t there.

israel has bombed apartments, homes, and the streets.  israel has bombed the beaches.  israel has put out snipers to shoot at fleeing women and children and men.

israel is an apartheid state.

hamas doesn’t exist in a vaccuum. israel created hamas.  without israeli oppression and occupation and apartheid, there would be no hamas.

wonder woman wouldn’t stand for any of this shit.  you are not right, gal gadot, and israel.  you are not right, and you will not overcome.  you will never overcome.

Reblogged on Jul 28 with 3,409 notes
via memewhore  org: swimmiesofdoom

thetumblr-thisisatumblr:

making plans with friends like

image

Reblogged on Jul 27 with 115,812 notes
via coluring  org: seafoamgreeen
humansofnewyork:

"Are you lonely?""It’s been a lifetime of loneliness. I decided early on that I better get used to it. I go to movies by myself. If the movie theater is completely empty, I’m even happier. I learned early on that if I wanted to go to restaurants, I better learn to go by myself. One benefit to being big is that people don’t bother you. I’m shocked that you came up to me. Nobody’s ever done that. When I started to go to therapy, it took me several sessions before I even spoke a word. I’d just sit there and cry. And honestly, you caught me on a tough day. I was sitting here feeling really bad about myself. Because I went to the doctor today, and I was sure that I’d lost weight. But I’d gained some."

humansofnewyork:

"Are you lonely?"
"It’s been a lifetime of loneliness. I decided early on that I better get used to it. I go to movies by myself. If the movie theater is completely empty, I’m even happier. I learned early on that if I wanted to go to restaurants, I better learn to go by myself. One benefit to being big is that people don’t bother you. I’m shocked that you came up to me. Nobody’s ever done that. When I started to go to therapy, it took me several sessions before I even spoke a word. I’d just sit there and cry. And honestly, you caught me on a tough day. I was sitting here feeling really bad about myself. Because I went to the doctor today, and I was sure that I’d lost weight. But I’d gained some."

Reblogged on Jul 27 with 12,508 notes
via memewhore  org: humansofnewyork
del-sin:

samw1se:

underage-fangirl:

joelayheymanasdicks:

sobsbcyoutubers:

skin-like-snowflakes:

masterdust:

uncannibal:

guccipoop:

Beautiful

I THOUGHT IT WAS SO FLOWY AND COOL AND SO ODD LIKE WOW ITS LIKE THE PERFECT SHAPE TO FLOW DOWN AND DROP LIKE THAT AND THEN I REALIZED IT WAS A BUNCH OF MINIATURE DICKS SO I WAS JUST„, “OH”

I thought they were peanuts

At first glance I saw jellybeans

I thought they were babies help

I thought it was a human spine…..

The dicks only make it better

WAY TO CUT OFF THE BEST PART OF THE WHOLE GIF


this is what physics simulations are for. simulations of falling, stacked dildos. and one long one.

del-sin:

samw1se:

underage-fangirl:

joelayheymanasdicks:

sobsbcyoutubers:

skin-like-snowflakes:

masterdust:

uncannibal:

guccipoop:

Beautiful

I THOUGHT IT WAS SO FLOWY AND COOL AND SO ODD LIKE WOW ITS LIKE THE PERFECT SHAPE TO FLOW DOWN AND DROP LIKE THAT AND THEN I REALIZED IT WAS A BUNCH OF MINIATURE DICKS SO I WAS JUST„, “OH”

I thought they were peanuts

At first glance I saw jellybeans

I thought they were babies help

I thought it was a human spine…..

The dicks only make it better

WAY TO CUT OFF THE BEST PART OF THE WHOLE GIF

this is what physics simulations are for. simulations of falling, stacked dildos. and one long one.

Reblogged on Jul 27 with 113,207 notes
via hanamiya-makoto-chan  org: nutnics
Reblogged on Jul 27 with 464 notes
via memewhore  org: agriking

“Falling in love is not the only adventure worthy of a young woman.”

- Caitlin Stasey

Everything you love is here

(via lovequotesrus)
Reblogged on Jul 27 with 11,811 notes
via lovequotesrus  org: bbrian4

bewbin:

bewbin:

Now that I’m an adult I have to make more serious posts

Briefcase

Reblogged on Jul 27 with 466,806 notes
via pullmycartknee  org: bewbin
groovychainsaws:

American education

groovychainsaws:

American education

Reblogged on Jul 27 with 209,060 notes
via nsome  org: groovychainsaws

jacobshutup:

u can tell im real because if i was gonna catfish id use someone hot

Reblogged on Jul 27 with 276,091 notes
via pullmycartknee
afro-dominicano:

sourcedumal:

havecrayonswilltravel:

anonymousatheist420:

And now you know…
The real “Lone Ranger,” it turns out, was an African American man named Bass Reeves, who the legend was based upon. Perhaps not surprisingly, many aspects of his life were written out of the story, including his ethnicity. The basics remained the same: a lawman hunting bad guys, accompanied by a Native American, riding on a white horse, and with a silver trademark.Historians of the American West have also, until recently, ignored the fact that this man was African American, a free black man who headed West to find himself less subject to the racist structure of the established Eastern and Southern states.While historians have largely overlooked Reeves, there have been a few notable works on him. Vaunda Michaux Nelson’s book, Bad News for Outlaws: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy U.S. Marshal, won the 2010 Coretta Scott King Award for best author. Arthur Burton released an overview of the man’s life a few years ago. Black Gun, Silver Star: The Life and Legend of Frontier Marshal Bass Reeves recounts that Reeves was born into a life of slavery in 1838. His slave-keeper brought him along as another personal servant when he went off to fight with the Confederate Army, during the Civil War.Reeves took the chaos that ensued during the war to escape for freedom, after beating his “master” within an inch of his life, or according to some sources, to death. Perhaps the most intriguing thing about this escape was that Reeves only beat his enslaver after the latter lost sorely at a game of cards with Reeves and attacked him.After successfully defending himself from this attack, he knew that there was no way he would be allowed to live if he stuck around.Reeves fled to the then Indian Territory of today’s Oklahoma and lived harmoniously among the Seminole and Creek Nations of Native American Indians.After the Civil War finally concluded, he married and eventually fathered ten children, making his living as a Deputy U.S. Marshall in Arkansas and the Indian Territory. If this surprises you, it should, as Reeves was the first African American to ever hold such a position.Burton explains that it was at this point that the Lone Ranger story comes into play. Reeves was described as a “master of disguises”. He used these disguises to track down wanted criminals, even adopting similar ways of dressing and mannerisms to meet and fit in with the fugitives, in order to identify them.Reeves kept and gave out silver coins as a personal trademark of sorts, just like the Lone Ranger’s silver bullets. Of course, the recent Disney adaptation of the Lone Ranger devised a clever and meaningful explanation for the silver bullets in the classic tales. For the new Lone Ranger, the purpose was to not wantonly expend ammunition and in so doing devalue human life. But in the original series, there was never an explanation given, as this was simply something originally adapted from Reeves’ personal life and trademarking of himself. For Reeves, it had a very different meaning, he would give out the valuable coins to ingratiate himself to the people wherever he found himself working, collecting bounties. In this way, a visit from the real “Lone Ranger” meant only good fortune for the town: a criminal off the street and perhaps a lucky silver coin.Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves was also an expert crack shot with a gun. According to legend, shooting competitions had an informal ban on allowing him to enter. Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves rode a white horse throughout almost all of his career, at one point riding a light grey one as well.Like the famed Lone Ranger legend Reeves had his own close friend like Tonto. Reeves’ companion was a Native American posse man and tracker who he often rode with, when he was out capturing bad guys. In all, there were close to 3000 of such criminals they apprehended, making them a legendary duo in many regions.The final proof that this legend of Bass Reeves directly inspired into the story of the Lone Ranger can be found in the fact that a large number of those criminals were sent to federal prison in Detroit. The Lone Ranger radio show originated and was broadcast to the public in 1933 on WXYZ in Detroit where the legend of Reeves was famous only two years earlier.Of course, WXYZ and the later TV and movie adaptions weren’t about to make the Lone Ranger an African American who began his career by beating a slave-keeper to death. But now you know. Spread the word and let people know the real legend of the Lone Ranger.
Via https://plus.google.com/b/113376504911684406239/109950959928032580820

okay no, but for real, this dude was a badass. he was basically the black batman of the wild west.
acording to wiki: “ Reeves brought in some of the most dangerous criminals of the time, but was never wounded, despite having his hat and belt shot off on separate occasions.”
here’s an article that details some of his career.

I want a kickstarter made to get the real story done.

He deserves that much and more tbh.

afro-dominicano:

sourcedumal:

havecrayonswilltravel:

anonymousatheist420:

And now you know…


The real “Lone Ranger,” it turns out, was an African American man named Bass Reeves, who the legend was based upon. Perhaps not surprisingly, many aspects of his life were written out of the story, including his ethnicity. The basics remained the same: a lawman hunting bad guys, accompanied by a Native American, riding on a white horse, and with a silver trademark.

Historians of the American West have also, until recently, ignored the fact that this man was African American, a free black man who headed West to find himself less subject to the racist structure of the established Eastern and Southern states.

While historians have largely overlooked Reeves, there have been a few notable works on him. Vaunda Michaux Nelson’s book, Bad News for Outlaws: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy U.S. Marshal, won the 2010 Coretta Scott King Award for best author. Arthur Burton released an overview of the man’s life a few years ago. Black Gun, Silver Star: The Life and Legend of Frontier Marshal Bass Reeves recounts that Reeves was born into a life of slavery in 1838. His slave-keeper brought him along as another personal servant when he went off to fight with the Confederate Army, during the Civil War.

Reeves took the chaos that ensued during the war to escape for freedom, after beating his “master” within an inch of his life, or according to some sources, to death. Perhaps the most intriguing thing about this escape was that Reeves only beat his enslaver after the latter lost sorely at a game of cards with Reeves and attacked him.

After successfully defending himself from this attack, he knew that there was no way he would be allowed to live if he stuck around.

Reeves fled to the then Indian Territory of today’s Oklahoma and lived harmoniously among the Seminole and Creek Nations of Native American Indians.

After the Civil War finally concluded, he married and eventually fathered ten children, making his living as a Deputy U.S. Marshall in Arkansas and the Indian Territory. If this surprises you, it should, as Reeves was the first African American to ever hold such a position.

Burton explains that it was at this point that the Lone Ranger story comes into play. Reeves was described as a “master of disguises”. He used these disguises to track down wanted criminals, even adopting similar ways of dressing and mannerisms to meet and fit in with the fugitives, in order to identify them.

Reeves kept and gave out silver coins as a personal trademark of sorts, just like the Lone Ranger’s silver bullets. Of course, the recent Disney adaptation of the Lone Ranger devised a clever and meaningful explanation for the silver bullets in the classic tales. For the new Lone Ranger, the purpose was to not wantonly expend ammunition and in so doing devalue human life. But in the original series, there was never an explanation given, as this was simply something originally adapted from Reeves’ personal life and trademarking of himself. For Reeves, it had a very different meaning, he would give out the valuable coins to ingratiate himself to the people wherever he found himself working, collecting bounties. In this way, a visit from the real “Lone Ranger” meant only good fortune for the town: a criminal off the street and perhaps a lucky silver coin.

Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves was also an expert crack shot with a gun. According to legend, shooting competitions had an informal ban on allowing him to enter. Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves rode a white horse throughout almost all of his career, at one point riding a light grey one as well.

Like the famed Lone Ranger legend Reeves had his own close friend like Tonto. Reeves’ companion was a Native American posse man and tracker who he often rode with, when he was out capturing bad guys. In all, there were close to 3000 of such criminals they apprehended, making them a legendary duo in many regions.

The final proof that this legend of Bass Reeves directly inspired into the story of the Lone Ranger can be found in the fact that a large number of those criminals were sent to federal prison in Detroit. The Lone Ranger radio show originated and was broadcast to the public in 1933 on WXYZ in Detroit where the legend of Reeves was famous only two years earlier.

Of course, WXYZ and the later TV and movie adaptions weren’t about to make the Lone Ranger an African American who began his career by beating a slave-keeper to death. But now you know. Spread the word and let people know the real legend of the Lone Ranger.

Via https://plus.google.com/b/113376504911684406239/109950959928032580820

okay no, but for real, this dude was a badass. he was basically the black batman of the wild west.

acording to wiki: “ Reeves brought in some of the most dangerous criminals of the time, but was never wounded, despite having his hat and belt shot off on separate occasions.”

here’s an article that details some of his career.

I want a kickstarter made to get the real story done.

He deserves that much and more tbh.

Reblogged on Jul 27 with 22,519 notes
via alphaclerek  org: anonymousatheist420
Reblogged on Jul 27 with 27,231 notes
via estychan  org: sirdef

yoyotrohman:

yoyotrohman:

yesterday i asked the guys to do a 90’s boyband pose and patrick immediately got into position but joe went wait i dont understand what do you mean?? and i went you know like cool but not really cool or whatever like white boy cool and he went OHH WHITE BOY COOL I GOT U and made his pose and kept repeating im coooollll until i had to go and long story short joe trohman is a national treasure

image

Reblogged on Jul 27 with 14,191 notes
via thegirlwiththemooglehat  org: yoyotrohman

mgann-morzz:

McDonald’s worker arrested after telling company president she can’t afford shoes.

"A woman who has been employed by the McDonald’s Corporation for over 10 years says she was arrested last week after she confronted the company president at a meeting and told him she couldn’t afford to buy shoes or food for her children.

Nancy Salgado, 26, told The Real News that she felt like she had to speak out during McDonald’s USA President Jeff Stratton’s speech at the Union League Club of Chicago on Friday for the sake of her children.

“It’s really hard for me to feed my two kids and struggle day to day,” she shouted as Stratton was speaking. “Do you think this is fair, that I have to be making $8.25 when I’ve worked for McDonald’s for ten years?”

“I’ve been there for forty years,” Stratton replied from the podium.

“The thing is that I need a raise. But you’re not helping your employees. How is this possible?” Salgado asked.

At that point, someone approached Salgado and informed her that she was going to be arrested.

She later recalled the encounter to The Real News’ Jessica Desvarieux.

“The strength was very powerful, like, just remembering the face of my kids, like I say, you know, just simple things like I can’t provide a pair of shoes like everybody else does, sometimes every month, or anything like that,” she said. “And he needs to know we are what all the employees at McDonald’s are going through. We’re struggling day to day to provide our needs in our houses, things for our kids. And it’s just–it gets harder and harder with just the poverty wage they have us living in.”

“They just told me, you know, well, you’re being under arrest because you just interrupted, you trespassed the property. You’re just going to go to jail,” Salgado added. “And what I remember just telling them, ‘well, like, so, because I have to speak out my mind and I had to tell the president the poverty wage I’m living in, that’s just against the law?’ You know, just be able to speak up your mind and say, you know what, I can’t survive with $8.25? It’s just — it’s ridiculous that I’m going to get arrested. You know.”

Salgado, who is still working at McDonald’s, said she had her hours cut following the arrest and feared further retaliation.

“The CEOs make millions and billions a year and why can’t they provide enough for their employees?” she wondered.”

I think that this is beyond awful for many reasons. People can’t afford to live off of the wages that they are given currently, and can’t even speak out against it. I know tumblr is great for spreading important news like this, so please help me get the word out to support this woman.

Reblogged on Jul 27 with 45,324 notes
via misandry-mermaid  org: mgann-morzz
©